(Source: truegunner)

sportbygettyimages:

FIS Nordic World Cup - Biathlon - Women’s Relay
Athletes during the IBU Biathlon World Cup Women’s Relay on December 09, 2012 in Hochfilzen, Austria.
Photo by Stanko Gruden/Agence Zoom/Getty Images

sportbygettyimages:

FIS Nordic World Cup - Biathlon - Women’s Relay

Athletes during the IBU Biathlon World Cup Women’s Relay on December 09, 2012 in Hochfilzen, Austria.

Photo by Stanko Gruden/Agence Zoom/Getty Images

(Source: rina-tissen)

becoacht:

Please welcome Andreas “Andi” Birnbacher. Andi is one of Germany’s top biathletes who won various World Championships in his very impressive career. He skates fast as the wind and draws faster than his shadow. Welcome to the becoacht ambassadors club and thank you for supporting us, Andi.

becoacht:

Please welcome Andreas “Andi” Birnbacher. Andi is one of Germany’s top biathletes who won various World Championships in his very impressive career. He skates fast as the wind and draws faster than his shadow. Welcome to the becoacht ambassadors club and thank you for supporting us, Andi.

collegehumor:

Bruce Willis Went Too Hard
You never go full “Die Hard”.

collegehumor:

Bruce Willis Went Too Hard

You never go full “Die Hard”.

(Source: reddit.com)


Jesus drove a Honda but didn’t talk about it, “For I did not speak of my own accord” -John 12:49

Jesus drove a Honda but didn’t talk about it, “For I did not speak of my own accord” -John 12:49

(Source: thankgodweliveinthistime, via shavingryansprivates)

collegehumor:

Dumb Ways to Die

Don’t worry, watching this video is not one of them. Truth be told though, it probably could be.

(Source: youtube.com)

collegehumor:

Electric Wheelchairs Decked Out with Subwoofers
They hear me rollin’. 
nashtari:

Redneck Medical Terms

nashtari:

Redneck Medical Terms

Teacher: “Have you done your homework?” Student: “Have you graded my test?” Teacher: “No, I have other student’s stuff to grade” Student: “I have other teacher’s homework to do”

neurolove:

Split brain is a term used to refer to someone who has had the corpus callosum (a white fiber tract connecting the two sides of the brain, discussed in the last post) severed.  Therefore, the two sides of the brain cannot communicate with each other.  The reason that this would be done is usually in very severe cases of epilepsy.  Seizures are caused by brain activity synchronizing at extremely high levels.  Therefore, you can prevent seizures by preventing the whole brain from being able to synchronize its neuronal activity.
Split brain patients act entirely normally during normal life.  It is only when doing tasks, such as those that only use one side’s visual field, that you can notice abnormal behavior.  The left side of the brain contains all of the language centers.  Therefore, whatever is in the left visual field (above: “RING”) can be spoken aloud.  The right side of the brain is more abstract- relating to more “artistic” things- like spatial reasoning.  Therefore, whatever can be seen in the right visual field (above: “KEY”) can be drawn or picked out, but it cannot be verbalized.  This becomes extra cool when you ask the patient, “Why did you pick up the key?”  In asking verbally, you are talking to the left side of their brain, which did not see the word KEY (They will say they only saw the word RING).  Instead, they will come up with some logical reason (For instance, they might say something like “Oh, I was thinking about when I get to go home- I’ll need to grab my keys.” or “I liked the texture of the key.” or “I saw RING, and thought of my key ring.”).  The reason depends on the person, but the mind can come up with a reasonable explanation (albeit inaccurate) for any behavior.  Split brain research helped us to realize that this sort of reasoning happens in the left hemisphere. 
Additionally, the right hand (which receives input from the left brain) is terrible at drawing or spatial reasoning tasks (matching a pattern of blocks for instance) in split brain patients who don’t have the normal communication, which helped us to learn that this behavior is localized to the right hemisphere.  I was lucky enough to see a talk by Gazzaniga who is one of the pioneers of split brain research a few years ago.  He showed a really interesting video of a patient having to put together a set of blocks in a pattern.  He had them sit on the left hand and do the task with the right.  The right hand would just make a mess of the blocks.  The left hand of one patient kept trying to come in and fix what the right hand was making such a mess of.  Kind of like a “No, no, you’re doing it wrong- let me!” response.  It was really fascinating.  I’ll show more about this in my next post.
[Image Source]

neurolove:

Split brain is a term used to refer to someone who has had the corpus callosum (a white fiber tract connecting the two sides of the brain, discussed in the last post) severed.  Therefore, the two sides of the brain cannot communicate with each other.  The reason that this would be done is usually in very severe cases of epilepsy.  Seizures are caused by brain activity synchronizing at extremely high levels.  Therefore, you can prevent seizures by preventing the whole brain from being able to synchronize its neuronal activity.

Split brain patients act entirely normally during normal life.  It is only when doing tasks, such as those that only use one side’s visual field, that you can notice abnormal behavior.  The left side of the brain contains all of the language centers.  Therefore, whatever is in the left visual field (above: “RING”) can be spoken aloud.  The right side of the brain is more abstract- relating to more “artistic” things- like spatial reasoning.  Therefore, whatever can be seen in the right visual field (above: “KEY”) can be drawn or picked out, but it cannot be verbalized.  This becomes extra cool when you ask the patient, “Why did you pick up the key?”  In asking verbally, you are talking to the left side of their brain, which did not see the word KEY (They will say they only saw the word RING).  Instead, they will come up with some logical reason (For instance, they might say something like “Oh, I was thinking about when I get to go home- I’ll need to grab my keys.” or “I liked the texture of the key.” or “I saw RING, and thought of my key ring.”).  The reason depends on the person, but the mind can come up with a reasonable explanation (albeit inaccurate) for any behavior.  Split brain research helped us to realize that this sort of reasoning happens in the left hemisphere. 

Additionally, the right hand (which receives input from the left brain) is terrible at drawing or spatial reasoning tasks (matching a pattern of blocks for instance) in split brain patients who don’t have the normal communication, which helped us to learn that this behavior is localized to the right hemisphere.  I was lucky enough to see a talk by Gazzaniga who is one of the pioneers of split brain research a few years ago.  He showed a really interesting video of a patient having to put together a set of blocks in a pattern.  He had them sit on the left hand and do the task with the right.  The right hand would just make a mess of the blocks.  The left hand of one patient kept trying to come in and fix what the right hand was making such a mess of.  Kind of like a “No, no, you’re doing it wrong- let me!” response.  It was really fascinating.  I’ll show more about this in my next post.

[Image Source]

justyouraverageginger:

Have you seen my mum?
#empty child #most people asked if I was a dead Newsie but whatevs

collegehumor:

CollegeHumor reporting in (from our respective homes) as we brace for hurricane Sandy to hit NYC. 

Reblog and add your photo to show us how you’re preparing, East Coast!

doctorwho:

sherlockiansunite:

Wibbly Wobbly Spooky Wooky
(the pumpkin’s bigger on the inside ;D)

Doctor Who Pumpkins for Wholloween. Favorite pumpkins get posted to the Doctor Who Facebook Page later this week!

doctorwho:

sherlockiansunite:

Wibbly Wobbly Spooky Wooky

(the pumpkin’s bigger on the inside ;D)

Doctor Who Pumpkins for Wholloween. Favorite pumpkins get posted to the Doctor Who Facebook Page later this week!